Treasure Your Children

Last week, my son, Wes turned 16. What a milestone! Another driver will soon be unleashed on northern Wisconsin’s highways. The last time, as we returned from practice driving, Wes said, “Dad, you’re doing much better. You didn’t scream once!”

My son’s 16th has put me in the pondering mood. No job in the entire world is more important that the molding of young lives. Years fly swiftly. They are little for such a short while, then they grow up and fly from the nest.

I have a special word of encouragement for the younger moms and dads reading this column: please take the time to treasure your children.

The following appeared in a church bulletin many years ago. The author is unknown.

If I Had My Child to Raise Again

If I had my child to raise all over again,
I'd finger paint more,
And point the finger less.
I would do less correcting,
And more connecting.
I'd take my eye off the watch,
And watch with my eyes.
I would care to know less and
Know to care more.
I'd take more hikes and fly more kites.
I'd stop playing serious,
And seriously play.
I would run through more fields and
Gaze at more stars.
I'd do more hugging and less tugging.
I'd build self-esteem first,
And the house later.
I would be firm less often,
And affirm much more.
I'd teach less about the love of power,
And more about the power of love.


“Train up a child in the way he should go,” the proverb instructs us, “and when he is old, he will not depart from it.”

With this in mind, Josh Billings noted, “To train up a child in the way he should go, travel that way yourself once in a while.”

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